New year’s traditions around the world

New year’s traditions around the world

by Cecilia Dos Santos

No matter where you are in the world, chances are you celebrate the New Year in some way. But have you ever wondered how different people around the globe ring in the new year? From Denmark to Thailand, people have all sorts of unique traditions and customs that they follow. Keep reading to learn about some of the most interesting New Year’s traditions from all over the planet!

Japan

In Japan, New Year’s Eve, or “Oshogatsu,” is a time of celebration and tradition. One of the most popular traditions is the “toshikoshi soba,” or “year-crossing noodles,” which are eaten on New Year’s Eve to symbolize a long and healthy life. It is also common for people to visit temples and shrines to pray for good fortune in the new year and to decorate their homes with pine and bamboo, which are symbols of longevity and good luck.

Another popular tradition is the “joya no kane,” or “bell-ringing ceremony,” which involves ringing a large temple bell 108 times to symbolize the 108 human desires that are believed to cause suffering. This ceremony is held at midnight on New Year’s Eve and is believed to purify the mind and bring good fortune for the new year.

See our hotels in Japan here.

China

In China, New Year’s Eve, or “Chuxi,” is a time of celebration and tradition. One popular tradition is the “Chu Xi Fan,” or “New Year’s Eve Dinner,” which is a special meal that is traditionally eaten at midnight to mark the end of the old year and the beginning of the new year. The meal typically consists of fish, dumplings, and other dishes that are believed to bring good luck and prosperity for the new year.

People also set off firecrackers and give each other red envelopes filled with money.

It is common for people to decorate their homes with red lanterns and paper cuttings and set off fireworks at midnight to mark the end of the old year and the beginning of the new year.

See our hotels in China here.

Korea

In Korea, people wear traditional clothes called hanboks and bow to each other.

New Year’s Eve, or “Seollal,” in Korea is a time of celebration and tradition. One popular tradition is the “Sebeolsik,” or “traditional New Year’s Eve meal,” a special meal traditionally eaten at midnight to mark the end of the old year and the beginning of the new year. The meal typically consists of rice cake soup, dried seaweed soup, and other dishes believed to bring good luck and prosperity for the new year.

Another popular tradition is the “Charye,” or “ancestor memorial service,” a ceremony in which people pay respects to their ancestors and pray for good fortune in the new year. It is also common for people to play traditional games, such as yutnori, and to exchange gifts with family and friends.

See our hotels in Korea here.

Thailand

In Thailand, people release birds and animals from captivity as a symbol of good luck. Thai people are very sentimental when it comes to their family and ancestral home. During new year’s, many Thai people visit their hometowns to meet the elders.

Overall, New Year’s Eve in Thailand is a time of joy, celebration, and tradition, and it is an opportunity for people to come together and start the new year off with a positive and hopeful attitude. It is a time to let go of the past and embrace the new opportunities that the future has in store. So, let’s make the most of this special occasion and welcome the new year with open hearts and minds.

See our hotels in Thailand here.

Brazil

In Brazil, people eat lentils and rice for good luck in the new year.

New Year’s Eve, or “Réveillon,” in Brazil is a time of celebration and tradition. One popular tradition is the “Sete ondas,” or “seven waves,” in which people to jump through the waves seven times as a way of welcoming the new year and asking for good luck and prosperity. This fun and festive tradition is meant to bring good luck and prosperity for the new year.

Another popular tradition is the “Fogueira de Ano Novo,” or “New Year’s bonfire,” which is a large bonfire that is set on the beach and symbolizes the burning of the old year and the welcoming of the new year.

Overall, New Year’s Eve in Brazil is a time of joy, celebration, and tradition, and it is an opportunity for people to come together and start the new year off with a positive and hopeful attitude. It is a time to let go of the past and embrace the new opportunities that the future has in store. So, if you’re in Brazil on New Year’s Eve, be sure to join in on the fun and jump through the seven waves at midnight – who knows, it might just bring you good luck and prosperity for the new year!

See our hotels in Brazil here.

Denmark

In Denmark, New Year’s Eve, or “Nytårsaften,” is a time of celebration and tradition. One popular tradition is the “New Year’s Dive,” in which people brave the cold and take a dip in the ocean or a lake to welcome the new year. It is believed that this tradition brings good luck and prosperity for the new year.

Another popular tradition is the “Nytårsfyrværkeri,” or “New Year’s Fireworks,” which are set off at midnight to mark the start of the new year. It is common for people to attend parties and make resolutions for the new year. Many Danes gather around and watch the yearly speech that the queen gives, wishing everyone the best new year.

A traditional food that is often served on New Year’s Eve is “kransekage,” a type of cake made of rings of almond paste that are stacked and decorated with flags or other symbols.

See our hotels in Denmark here.

Spain

One of the most iconic traditions of New Year’s Eve in Spain is the “12 grapes of luck,” in which people eat one grape for each chime of the clock at midnight, making a wish with each grape. It is believed that this tradition brings good luck for the new year. In addition to this tradition, New Year’s Eve in Spain is also marked by other customs such as the “caga tió,” a wooden log with a painted face and a red hat that is hit with sticks and filled with sweets and small gifts, and attending parties, making resolutions, and watching the annual New Year’s Eve television special. All of these traditions are an integral part of Spain’s cultural identity and contribute to the overall joy and celebration of the holiday.

See our hotels in Spain here.

Ireland

New Year’s Eve in Ireland is a time of celebration and tradition marked by various customs and activities. These include the “First Footing” tradition, in which the first person to enter a house after midnight is seen as a symbol of good luck for the year ahead, as well as the “Hogmanay Street Party,” a popular celebration in the capital city of Edinburgh that features live music, dancing, and a fireworks display. Singing “Auld Lang Syne” at midnight is a common tradition in Ireland to mark the start of the new year. All of these customs are an integral part of Ireland’s cultural identity and contribute to the overall joy and celebration of the holiday.

See our hotels in Ireland here.

Philippines

New Year’s Eve, or “Bagong Taon,” is a time of celebration and tradition in the Philippines. One popular tradition is the “Media Noche,” or “Midnight Supper,” which involves a feast of traditional dishes such as lechon (roasted pig), noodles, and fruits and is meant to bring good luck for the new year. It is also common for people to attend church services and set off fireworks at midnight to welcome the new year.

Another popular tradition is the “Pamalandong,” which involves throwing coins, coins, and other small objects into the air at midnight as a way of symbolically “throwing away” the problems and difficulties of the previous year. It is believed that this tradition brings good luck and prosperity for the new year.

See our hotels in the Philippines here.

Greece

In Greece, New Year’s Eve, or “Protohronia,” is a time of celebration and tradition. Many attend church services, decorate their homes with basil and flowers, and set off fireworks at midnight to welcome the new year.

One of the most popular traditions is the “melomakarona,” a type of cookie made with honey and nuts that is served during the holiday season. Another popular tradition is the “vasilopita,” a special cake that is baked with a coin inside. The cake is cut and served on New Year’s Day, and the person who finds the coin is believed to have good luck for the rest of the year.

In addition to these traditions, it is also common for people to exchange gifts and make resolutions for the new year. Many people also visit friends and family, and some gather around the television to watch the annual New Year’s Eve music and comedy show, “Protohronia Sto Hristoforo.”

See our hotels in Greece here.

We hope you enjoyed learning about some of the unique and fascinating New Year’s Eve traditions from around the world. From the “12 grapes of luck” in Spain to the “seven waves” in Brazil, it’s clear that every culture has its own special way of celebrating this special occasion.

Did you learn something new in this blog post? Let us know about your own New Year’s Eve traditions in the comments below! And if you’re feeling inspired to explore new cultures and traditions, why not consider traveling the world and experiencing all it has to offer? Who knows what amazing traditions you might discover along the way? Happy New Year!

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